One & Ortakoy

LOCATION
ISTANBUL / TURKEY
ARCHITECTURAL PROJECT & DESIGN
GOKHAN AVCIOGLU & GAD
PROJECT TEAM
OZAN ERTUG, TAHSIN INANICI, GIZEM KIROGLU, ERTUGRUL MORCOL, NESIME ONEL, BARIS UCAR
BUILDING TYPE
RESIDENTIAL, DORMITORY
CONSTRUCTION AREA
56.000 m2
PROJECT SITE AREA
12.000 m2
YEAR
2008
STATUS
BUILT
PHOTOGRAPHER
GAD
AWARDS
2012 GREEN GOOD DESIGN AWARDS FOR ONE & ORTAKOY, THE EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE & THE CHICAGO ATHENAEUM
The city of Istanbul has lost most of its green space due to poor urban planning and unpermitted construction. In the last 50 years the population of the city has exploded, growing from 1.5 million in 1960 to more than 15 million inhabitants today. This has led to a significant deterioration in air and water quality, and an unmitigated loss of habitat. One & Ortaköy is an attempt to reclaim much-needed green space that provides a compelling example of how new construction incorporating the tenets of sustainability can increase the quality of urban life.

One & Ortaköy is constructed housing complex in the Istanbul neighborhood of Ortaköy. The project consists of two buildings: one building is private condominiums; and the other is reserved for student housing for nearby universities, managed by Republika. Nestled next to a hillside, the project is an iconic step forward in an area blighted by unplanned growth.

The One & Ortaköy project’s form, facade and overall organization were developed through a series of experimental strategies influenced by the site’s context and the desire to use every available building surface from the roofs, vertical surfaces and balconies down to the below grade spaces as opportunities to provide greenery and amenity.  

Conceived of as a green recreational area, the roof terraces include a running track, swimming pool and extensively planted gardens. These green roofs perform a number of important functions. They lessen the "heat island" effect by providing shade and an additional layer of insulation, filter pollutants, absorb and filter rainwater which is then stored and re-circulated for irrigation, and eventually will create habitat for nesting birds and flora. Visually these rooftop gardens blur the building profiles, lessening the scale of the buildings and merge them with the surrounding topography. 

A facade of regionally quarried sandstone wraps both buildings, providing a visually "soft” skin that blends with the natural hillside setting. The undulating surface treatment of the facade provides shade and opportunities for vertical plantings on alternating floors, allowing greenery to spill over balconies as hanging gardens. 

Large openings at the ground floor allow light and air into the below grade levels, and the combination of gabion stone walls and vertical garden walls transform subterranean service and recreational areas of the building into indoor/outdoor garden spaces.
 
 
 
" Why Roofs would be Our Gardens
.....................
They used to decorate the houses already in the antiquity like those built by King Nebuchadnezzar in the ancient city of Babylonia, around 590 BC and considered one of the seven wonders of the ancient world; like the roof gardens built in Roman times or the roofs covered by green sods in Scandinavia..
Currently more and more architects, designers and construction companies introduce  green roofing in their projects: the high urban development of the cities has caused a research of new green areas within the built-up area, to balance the metropolitan environment where we live.

Infact, the roof gardens have a lot to offer: they are not purely decorative, their realization leads interesting benefits in many sectors. In the city they could become a real protective barrier: they are a great acoustic insulator, holding back powders and the harmful substances transported by the wind, absorbing them through the photosynthesis process of the plants and producing oxygen.
Roof gardens can stop large amounts of rainwater, delaying  the flow towards pipes and sewage disposal, decreasing considerably the quantity impact on water collecting network.
This characteristic has positive consequences also on environmental well-being: it contains air dryness and, thanks to the slow evaporation of water, it maintains a good thermo-hygrometric balance.
In addition, recent university studies have proved that the substrate of roof gardens is able to absorb a good deal of the electromagnetic emissions of the cellular network and the transceivers.
The green roof has a positive impact on our well-being even in a direct way: it is able to affect our mood while satisfying the need to live in a natural environment. The perception of smells and rustle of leaves, the contact with nature and the vision of green tones help to relax and restore our psychophysical equilibrium.
If all this is not enough, you can not fail to consider that the roof gardens also increase the real estate value of buildings! "
 
by Forme d'Aqua

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